Guest Post: The Mood Elevator by Larry Senn


We could all do with an increased ability to handle life and all that it throws at us more effectively.  One of the more comprehensive, but readable books of late which attempts to show us how to do exactly that is The Mood Elevator:  Take Charge of Your Feelings, Become a Better You by Larry Senn.

Larry writes clearly and comprehensively about the factors that influence our daily well-being and the importance of choice in how our days and nights go.  His perspectives are well-supported and valuable for application in both our professional lives and our personal arenas.

 In honor of the launch of this useful book this week, a guest post from the author is below.  If you find this helpful, you will love the whole book.  I will have more to say about its value to me later in the week.

HOW TO DEAL WITH DOWN DAYS

by Dr. Larry Senn

There are countless pointers, tools, and books on how to be happy- and rightfully so, we’d all love to be happy and at the top of our Mood Elevator all the time.

Unfortunately, being happy all the time is just not reality. We will all spend times in the emotional basement since having low moods is a natural and normal part of life.  Human beings are unique in the animal kingdom because we have the power of thought. This allows us to imagine the future, plan for things yet to come, muse about possibilities, and analyze and interpret everything that is going on around us.

That same power to imagine through thought can also cause to us to worry excessively and unnecessarily, experience periods of depression about real or imagined problems, have moments of paranoia based on our assumptions about other’s motives, be self-righteous and judgmental, and even experience fits of anger and rage.

Because we take this ride on the Mood Elevator every day, it’s important to also have some tools on how to do well when you’re “in the red”. It’s not a bad thing to be in a bad mood, but it’s best to minimize the damage you cause when you’re having “one of those days”.

The best thing to remember when you wake up on the wrong side of the bed is to remember that you woke up on the wrong side of the bed. Having the awareness that you’re not at your best will help you proceed with caution throughout your day. Imagine when you’re driving somewhere on a cold, icy road at night. You’ll do the drive, but you’ll proceed with caution. You’ll drive slowly, take turns gently, and leave plenty of space between you and any other drivers on the road.

Think about that same tactic the next off day you’re having. If possible, reschedule that meeting with your coworker you butt heads with. The reason it’s so important to proceed with caution when you’re in the lower mood states is because our thinking becomes very unreliable when we’re down there.

Have you ever said something to a friend or loved one in the heat of the moment that you wished you could take back? Have you ever hit the send button to transmit an email that you later realized was a terrible mistake? If either of these has happened to you, think back to the circumstances. Where were you on the Mood Elevator map when this occurred? Most likely, you were somewhere in the lower half.

Imagine these two scenarios that are common in our everyday life and how we might get ourselves in trouble if we don’t recognize that our thinking is unreliable.

The first is getting an email that “pushes our buttons”. It might be accusatory, aggressive, or downright rude. After reading it we drop down to irritation, anger, or anxiety and our instinct is to write an email back giving the person a piece of our mind. These are the kind of situations when we’ll likely regret what we write. An alternative solution would be to write an email, and instead of hitting send, hit save as draft. Wait at least a few hours. If possible wait 24 hours and come back to it once we’ve had some time to cool off. Chances are we’ll be happy we didn’t send it. And, we might be at a higher level on the Mood Elevator the next day and are capable of sending a much more effective email, with a much better outcome.

The second scenario is the common one of having a disagreement with your spouse. My wife and I first got together in the 1970’s, the era of the human potential movement. The conventional wisdom at the time was encapsulated in saying like, “Tell it like it is, let it all hang out, and don’t go to bed with anything left unsaid.” As a result, there were a few times we struggled unproductively until all hours of the night, fighting over issues that, in retrospect, were usually not worth the time and energy.

As we both started understanding how our minds worked, we decided to set a ground rule that we don’t take on any significant relationship issues when either one of us are in the lower Mood Elevator states. It might look something like this:

Larry: It looks like something is bothering you. Is it something you want to talk about?

Bernadette: No, not now. My thinking is not clear. If I need to talk about it, I’ll let you know later.

Using the Mood Elevator as your guide and not acting on low-level thoughts and impulses when you are feeling down is one of the key principles to doing less damage to yourself-and to others.

About Dr. Larry Senn

Dr. Larry Senn pioneered the field of corporate culture and founded in 1978, Senn Delaney, the culture shaping unit of Heidrick & Struggles. A sought-after speaker, Senn has authored or co-authored several books, including two best-sellers. His newest is The Mood Elevator (August 2017), the follow up to his 2012 book, Up the Mood Elevator. You can learn more about Larry and his work at his website, www.themoodelevator.com.

 

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David Greer is an author, professional connection, and a truly good person.  Over at the Lead Change Group, he has shared a blog post with the news that his friend John Ridsdel, a Canadian hostages held by Islamic terrorists, has been killed.  David shares openly and very personally about his reaction and the learning that he has experienced from this event.  It’s a must read.

David also noted that a fund for girl’s education has been established in honor of his friend.  You can read the announcement from his blog post below. 

My friend John Ridsdel truly believed that woman were equal in our world. To honour John and that belief, his sister and two daughter’s have started a memorial fund to support girl’s education, protection and empowerment around the world. Should you wish to support this initiative, here is the link to the donation page:

https://plancanada.ca/JohnRidsdelMemorial

 I only ask that you consider memorializing John by contributing to this fund as you are able.

John

ENCORE POST: Refire! is Hot Stuff …


 

ME:  Slightly over a year ago, I reviewed this book.  Today I find myself immersed in the concepts of purpose, positive aging, and am spending considerable time figuring out how I can contribute to our generational rewriting of “retirement”.  I keep running into this book, as one of the essential resources for those interested in living a fuller and more meaningful live, right up to the last minute.

The post has been somewhat edited from the original, which posted on February 5, 2015, but my essential feeling remains the same:  THIS BOOK IS READABLE, THOUGHTFUL AND VALUABLE.

 

promo_03.pngSilly me … based on a cursory glance, I thought this book was about motivating employees to avoid firing or forcing them out.  

Prepared to slog dutifully through the text, notating strong points to share intelligently about the author’s message, I found myself instead absorbed in the perspectives being shared, reading rapidly, with frequent stops for reflection and margin scribbling.  This book engaged me on a very personal level.

Refire, Don’t Retire: Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life by Ken Blanchard and Morton Shaevitz is simply the right book with the right tone at the right time in the right place …

To refire is to approach life with gusto.  It’s to see each day as an opportunity for adventure and learning?  It’s to infuse passion and zest into every area of your life – emotional, intellectual, physical, and spiritual.  Heart, head, body, and soul. (pg. 9)

The authors understand clearly that “retirement age” does not mean what it has in the past for most of us.    We  want to continue to live significantly as conditions change around us and Blanchard and Shaevitz share four essential keys to help us do so:

FIRST KEY:  REFIRING EMOTIONALLY: 

“You can’t enrich your current relationships or forge new ones if you keep on doing the same things in the same ways.”  (pg. 31)

This section is about energizing our emotional connections and the strength that flows from them.  We know that change is essential to build strong emotional ties, but we are often prevented from changing because change involves risk.  We have to become brave.

Unless there’s a legitimate reasons to say no, you say yes! “ (pg. 41) says The Last-Minute Gang

This idea is the single most empowering concept in the book and challenging for many of us who have built comfortable and predictable lives.  Blanchard and Shaevitz encourage us to break out and risk by doing things we might usually pass on.  

This is especially effective when combined with the Nothing Ordinary rule:  

“ …a commitment to uniqueness … not to choose anything ordinary.” (pg.50) Continue reading

The War Is Here …


Merry Christmas

For years, I have heard my conservative Christian friends rant about the supposed “War on Christmas“, which by default became part of a larger “War on Christianity“.  

Their proof seemed rather thin to me, consisting mostly of some people in some stores saying something seasonal other than “Merry Christmas” to them and actions by schools, organizations, companies, and public spaces to reflect and respect the reality and the diversity of American society, rather than some half-imagined and more idealized version.

I did not believe that any war was being waged on Christians in this country.

I was dead wrong … Continue reading