ENCORE POST: Refire! is Hot Stuff …


 

ME:  Slightly over a year ago, I reviewed this book.  Today I find myself immersed in the concepts of purpose, positive aging, and am spending considerable time figuring out how I can contribute to our generational rewriting of “retirement”.  I keep running into this book, as one of the essential resources for those interested in living a fuller and more meaningful live, right up to the last minute.

The post has been somewhat edited from the original, which posted on February 5, 2015, but my essential feeling remains the same:  THIS BOOK IS READABLE, THOUGHTFUL AND VALUABLE.

 

promo_03.pngSilly me … based on a cursory glance, I thought this book was about motivating employees to avoid firing or forcing them out.  

Prepared to slog dutifully through the text, notating strong points to share intelligently about the author’s message, I found myself instead absorbed in the perspectives being shared, reading rapidly, with frequent stops for reflection and margin scribbling.  This book engaged me on a very personal level.

Refire, Don’t Retire: Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life by Ken Blanchard and Morton Shaevitz is simply the right book with the right tone at the right time in the right place …

To refire is to approach life with gusto.  It’s to see each day as an opportunity for adventure and learning?  It’s to infuse passion and zest into every area of your life – emotional, intellectual, physical, and spiritual.  Heart, head, body, and soul. (pg. 9)

The authors understand clearly that “retirement age” does not mean what it has in the past for most of us.    We  want to continue to live significantly as conditions change around us and Blanchard and Shaevitz share four essential keys to help us do so:

FIRST KEY:  REFIRING EMOTIONALLY: 

“You can’t enrich your current relationships or forge new ones if you keep on doing the same things in the same ways.”  (pg. 31)

This section is about energizing our emotional connections and the strength that flows from them.  We know that change is essential to build strong emotional ties, but we are often prevented from changing because change involves risk.  We have to become brave.

Unless there’s a legitimate reasons to say no, you say yes! “ (pg. 41) says The Last-Minute Gang

This idea is the single most empowering concept in the book and challenging for many of us who have built comfortable and predictable lives.  Blanchard and Shaevitz encourage us to break out and risk by doing things we might usually pass on.  

This is especially effective when combined with the Nothing Ordinary rule:  

“ …a commitment to uniqueness … not to choose anything ordinary.” (pg.50) Continue reading