Risking Without Risk …

Risking WIthout Risk - PresenterMedia.com

Well, we ALL want glory, right? …

Not really … most folks are probably more interested in stability, safety, enough to meet our needs and some of our wants, and to be known to those who we care about.

If you are one of those many, you may think this post and that quotation have little to offer you.   I beg to differ …

As we go through life, most of us are confronted by a series of firsts:  First overnight away from Mom and Dad, first airplane trip, first date, first kiss, first day of high school … and so on and so on throughout our lives.  First job interview, first job, first promotion, first challenge at work, first job loss, first time to buy a car, rent a house, buy a house, have a child, adopt a child, watch a child leave, lose a close friend or a loved one.

Every first includes some element of risk that we might not succeed or manage the moment.

Whether we desire risk in our lives or not is immaterial, because risk is already present and very prominent.   Risk is part of what makes life interesting and sometimes very exciting.  We risk every morning when we open our eyes, take a deep breath, and move. Continue reading

Reflections on Old Men and McDonald’s …


Every once in a while, a woman or a slightly younger man shows up, but this is almost exclusively an old man’s world.

Men of a certain maturity sit and chat, about the weather, about goings-on in their lives, their children and grandchildren, the state of the world, sometimes about politics, but that is often restricted to the local level or a chorus of people who all see things pretty much the same. 

Every tongue is loose and words flow freely … I wonder if they are this verbose in other situations or at home.  I imagine not …

Continue reading

Doing X Well and Failing …

Thumbs Up - Morguefile.com.pngI have often been complimented on how well I do X….

Being complimented makes me feel good … appreciated, valued, competent, and so forth.  This makes me do X more and better, because I like the praise and attention that comes my way.

 I often receive requests (or sometimes demands) from other people to do X for them.How I do X is shared and talked about at gatherings.   I become known to many as “The X Guy” or even, unfortunately, “The X Meister“.  People tell me how dependent they are on me doing that X thing regularly for them.

My fame for doing X well spreads far and wide, resulting in fascinating opportunities and offers to do X for someone else who will pay me more and shower me with glittery incentives … all just to do X.

Problem is that I do not particularly enjoy doing X … I like the praise, but not the process to earn the praise.

Continue reading

Feeding Our Purpose …

Purpose - 3 Hungers JPEG - Morguefile.com

Quotation Source:  Richard Leider (The Power of Purpose: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better. p. 45)

The above quote is from one of Leider’s older books, which I thought would be a good place to start my personal exploration of purpose.  I am engaged in several projects right now that have to do with discerning and living out what we are meant to be and I am having a blast revisiting some tools and strategies I first learned decades ago, while reading up on the more current thinking around how we discern what we are here to do.

I find Leider’s statement useful, because it incorporate three basic concerns for anyone who senses that there is more to life and work than simply making money.


In a world where we often experience the effects of someone else’s decisions or something else’s action, remembering that we have the power to choose can be difficult.

A greedy CEO takes action to protect his personal wealth and a company fails, with resultant job losses and turmoil.

Mother Nature reacts to global behavior and floods somewhere, while somewhere else experiences a massive drought, and severe weather seems to have become the norm for many, with property damage, loss of life, and economic upheaval following.

However, as anyone who has read Viktor E. Frankl knows:

Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” 

The freedom to choose is an important element in our lives.


We might now feel all that unique these days, as mass media continues to communicate how we ought to feel, think, and behave with shot-gun blasts of generalized messages in various forms.

The sheer weight of completing with 7.4 BILLION other people probably daunts many, which may be why so many of us seem unaware of all our neighbors and co-inhabitants of this planet.  

Our neighbors may be familiar to us in many ways.  They may resemble you physically, and we all share the same general range of emotions, values, beliefs, and attitudes.  Many of us have engaged in the same type of work as others, sometimes to the point of feeling lost in a gigantic stream of monochromatic “worker bees“.

Parents loves their children in a very universal way and the differences are usually superficial cultural, ethnic, or religious ones.

But nobody else is YOU… your unique combination of all of the above, plus your individual experiences in families, communities, and work environments … plus that “choice” thingie.   Even if your life is completely and totally the same as another, you have the ability to choose a different path.


As I am finding out, Leider and others who try to help us lead more purposeful lives, have a mantra that is repeated time and again … Knowing your purpose is nothing unless you act to actually engage in your purpose.

I do not have the link, but I remember reading about research that indicates that people who learn their purpose, but do not fulfill it, are actually less happy than those who do not engage in discerning what they were made to do, and definitely less happy than those who discern and then act.

“You don’t understand. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let’s face it.”

So says Marlon Brando‘s sad protagonist in the Oscar-winning 1954 film On The Waterfront.  If you only know of Brando’s more recent bloated and sinister acting, take a few hours to watch some  gut-wrenching acting.

We strive for purpose, because purpose creates a sense of meaning in our lives … if we then act on what we learn.  As I currently understand the journey to purpose, here is what purpose is not:

Purpose is not our work, although what we do for a living may reflect our purpose.

Purpose is also not what we enjoy doing, although we may enjoy living out our purpose.

Purpose is not our life goals, although our life goals may involve our purpose. 

Much more coming about this journey to purpose, but meanwhile:

How have you discerned your purpose in life?

How have you acted out your purpose?

What difference has this made for you?

Trying hard to consciously choose my best path and walk it with courage in the Heartland ….


Image:  Morguefile.com/Meditation


Doing and Deciding …

Doing Things - Gratisography.comKeeping it very simple this morning …

When we do something, we should best do it the right way for the right reasons.  This is both straightforward and easy to remember.

However, knowing what is right, instead of popular, easy, comfortable, or financially rewarding, is not always that simple.  Here are some general guidelines I have used over the years.  You will see glimmers of other much better-known guidelines throughout.  That is as I planned it to be …

Does what I plan to do support the general welfare or benefit a few at the expense of many?

Will others regard me more kindly or more suspiciously if I do this?

Am I committing an act of omission to avoid something unpleasant?

Would I be proud of this decision if my mother and father knew both what and why I chose?

How do I truly feel, in my heart of hearts, about my choice?

Trying hard to figure out what to do in the Heartland ….