“No Such Thing” …


No Such Thing - Gratisography.jpg

 

This may come as a shock, but I have made mistakes in my life … some real doozies, as they say.   Maybe you have too … after all, “To err is human”, as Pope says and since we are all humans, we probably all err.   

“TO ERR IS HUMAN, TO FORGIVE, DIVINE (Alexander Pope)

Actually, most of us seem to have the “erring” part of this quotation down.  It’s the “forgiving” part where we need some work:).

MAKING MISTAKES IS ONE OF THE COMMONALITIES OF LIFE …

Actually, accomplishing things almost always involves two important factors:  Taking risks and Failing.  Since both appear linked to doing things, we ought to be more comfortable navigating the terrain of failure, shouldn’t we?

What sets some people apart from others is how they handle making mistakes. Now I am no expert on how to handle mistakes, although I do hold advanced amateur standing. 

Here are some of my general ground rules for making mistakes:

DON’T BE A WUSS … ERR BIG …

Not like in a current popular song, but in this respect:  If you are going to dare and risk, might as well do it large, rather than inch along trying to stay safe and secure.

Erring big, in this case, does also not mean to take unnecessary or inappropriate risks, especially concerning people’s physical and emotional well-being.  I am encouraging you to take what might be called calculated risks.

APOLOGIZE LIKE YOU ARE REALLY SORRY …

Many of our public figures, especially pop culture celebrities and politicians need to tattoo this to the inside of their eyeballs.   An insincere or false apology is no better than denying responsibility for whatever you just caused.

Note:  this one requires that you understand, accept, and are actually sorry for what you did … not just that you were caught doing it.

CREATE THE ABILITY IN YOURSELF TO ANALYZE YOUR MISTAKES HONESTLY …

When we err, and we will err, we owe it to ourselves and others to quickly move through the process of identifying our mistakes, analyzing them for possible solutions or resolutions, and adjusting to insure smoother sailing as we continue on.  

This requires that we become very honest with ourselves about what we have done and what we have not done, and the further ability to get past the emotion and learn from what has occurred.

NURTURE YOUR OWN RESILIENCE …

Having the ability to bounce back from our mistakes is an essential part of developing as a person.  The more effectively we learn to deal with our “oops” as temporary lapses to be overcome, the more we are able to “dust ourselves off” and move on, using that learning to make better mistakes in the future.

Remember, coping is not about eliminating errors or mistakes, along with the discomfort and pain they often bring, but about learning how to survive the instances and thrive in the long run.

One excellent source to help you learn how to increase and nurture your personal resiliency is The Bounce-Back Quotient by Linda Nash.   This is a useful and easy-to-read tool to help you determine and enhance your personal resilience profile.

SO WHAT WOULD YOU ADD TO, AMEND OR CHANGE, OR ARGUE FOR REMOVING FROM THIS LIST?  

Trying very hard to be very positive when things go very negative in the Heartland ….

John

 

 

The Bounce Back Quotient at

Advertisements