Eli Pariser on his excitement for Upworthy, disappointment that the filter bubble isn’t popped


John Smith:

I follow Upworthy … uneven in offerings as it can be … because these folks have heart and believe in knowing and changing:)

Originally posted on TED Blog:

Who rules the Internet? These days it’s Upworthy, Eli Pariser’s socially-bent aggregator, which fills a gap in viral content where puppies used to sleep. The site’s sheer power on the Interwebs came quickly: In just two years, the site has come to fill the Facebook feeds of 5.4 million people. (So it’s no surprise that haters gonna headline-hate.)

[ted_talkteaser id=1091]Upworthy is Pariser’s first major project since he published his 2011 book, The Filter Bubble: How the New Personalized Web Is Changing What We Read and How We Think, which is also the subject of his TED Talk, given the same year. The filter bubble is the phenomenon whereby an algorithm tracks your clicks in your feeds and searches and, over time, predicts what it thinks you want. In theory, this could be a good thing. But it actively limits the variety of opinions you’re exposed to.

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